Of cats and Crane Mansions

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Ever wondered what your cat is really thinking? Here’s a  review by Nicholas Lezard of John Bradshaw’s  Cat Sense:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jul/29/cat-sense-john-bradshaw-review

And here’s another nice review of Writing is Easy from Bridget Kulakauskas at Illiterarty:

http://www.illiterarty.com/reviews/book-review-writing-easy-gert-loveday.

In answer to Bridget’s question about another book from Gert – yes!  Crane Mansions – a novel about the redeeming power of cake is in the copy-editing stage and our great cover designer Lisa Reidy is  mulling over a splendiferous cover. We’ll be posting more in coming months.

 

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7 thoughts on “Of cats and Crane Mansions

  1. You probably read the original version that was about 120,000 words long. Some serious pruning – this one is about 80,000 and the end is slightly different. But we hope people who liked it before will still like it and a few more will get to know it.

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    1. He is very correct about cats being smart. Ours responds to “stay,” and “come,” most of the time. Sometimes he considers it and decides that it’s not in anyone’s best interests so he leaves the room. One account that I read of cats and dogs said that dogs’ enzyme systems adapted to eating grains (specifically) wheat at about the time that agriculture got started, and thereafter, they stayed around and befriended humans because humans were a good source of food. Cats also began hanging around grain fields and humans at the same time because of the rodents that could be had for the taking; they are less domesticated because they aren’t depending on humans so directly for their food.

      That is an interesting point that you/Mr. Bradshaw makes about cats being enemies also of the magpies and rodents that prey on songbirds.

      Looking forward to Crane Mansions, along with all of your other fans . . .

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      1. Interesting implication in the theory you quote is that the simple dog attaches itself to the human as the source of food while the subtle cat assesses the situation for the opportunities it provides to exercise its independence and its skills.

        Someone just told me of a lady who puts her cat into a cattery from time to time and insists that the cat reads the “Australian Woman’s Weekly” so the staff have to go in each day and turn the page. Now that is clearly impossible to believe. What cat would take a day to read a page of the Woman’s Weekly, let alone need anyone to turn the page?

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