Wei T’ai


Poetry presents the thing in order to convey the feeling.  It should be precise about the thing and reticent about the feeling.


Wei T’ai, Sung Dynasty

Image  https://www.flickr.com/photos/madpoet_one/5474595877/


10 thoughts on “Wei T’ai

  1. Hi Gert — I don’t know the best way to do this — just wanted to say to Gabrielle that I participated in a haiku reading with a local poetry group this evening, and used two of her haiku (with proper attribution, of course). They were well received. Many thanks!


    1. I organized the haiku chronologically, and started with Issa:

      just simply alive
      both of us I
      and the poppy

      and followed with your:

      every quiet morning
      straw broom swishing
      dead leaves

      For the evening:

      up and down hill
      seeking the road home —
      evening star

      It was an especially good choice because Venus was bright in the sunset sky as I went into the reading, with the faintest beginning sliver of a new moon just west of it.


    1. I did include a few, but mostly used others. First time I’ve read poetry with a group, and that seemed to be the way that others were doing it.

      I followed your first one with another house cleaning theme:

      cleaning house, dusting
      I disrupt so many lives —
      my own, the spiders’

      I found a surreal one by Scott Metz:

      fireflies are
      eating rhinos

      and one that seems to sum up the spirit of haiku, by James Luguri:

      the narcissus opens
      nothing to believe
      nothing to doubt

      It was fun.


  2. I love the spider one. Many spiders in the garden at the moment- it seems so crass to break the webs but they have taken over the washing line. There’s a haiku in that.
    Yes, the narcissus one really hits the spot.


    1. Do you hang your clothes out? That is to say, you have a climate in which you can reliably hang them out without being eaten alive by mosquitoes, or expecting rain at any time, or bears wandering through the back yard . . . how civilized! The spiders taking over the line sounds like an excellent haiku.


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