Slapped with a wet fish

old-607710_1280

Reading a newspaper article by a sympathetic journalist about a politician fallen from glory, Gert learned that some years ago when he had suffered a career setback, he was enormously comforted by some wise words from his wife. Can you guess what she said?

It is what it is.

Did you, dear reader, fling your iPad/ laptop/ Smartphone across the room with a volley of curses when you read that? Did you go so far as to kick the cat? In other words, are you as fed-up with this asinine saying as Gert is?

Next time someone slaps you with this wet fish of platitude, stamp your feet and insist that it isn’t what it is, or it is what it isn’t.

I’ll let you in on a secret. The truth, and the source of most of our daily frustrations, is (if I can use that word):
It isn’t what it isn’t.

Image: https://pixabay.com/en/old-angry-woman-person-white-face-607710/

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14 thoughts on “Slapped with a wet fish

      1. A man’s got to do what a man’s got to do. You are who you are, I am who I am and it is a far, far better thing that you do, than wot you have ever done.

        What’s the name of the book and does it have lots of sex and violence?

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        1. Just remember, at the end of the day, at this point in time, what goes around comes around. You heard it here first.

          It is called The Art of the Possible. Yes, there is a sexy Finnish lady and violence committed by feral Oldies. Also Norse heroes, a wonder youth-drug, corrupt politicians, ice-skating, Latin dancing and free-running a, reality TV show, dancing Pomeranian dogs, and the Faith Apron Service that provides aprons to the farflung outpost of the British Empire.

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  1. Perhaps a title for a future book? Then the book could be flung across the room. Less messy than a device. Perhaps a good idea for a blog entry is ‘books to thrown across the room.’ The only book I have ever thrown was The Riders, by Tim Winton. Totally spontaneous response to the ending.

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    1. I haven’t read it but many reviews mentioned ‘the garden path.’ I like the review that included the words,’you could tell the writing was good because there were lots of big words used interestingly.’
      Hopefully Gert’s books don’t invite that response( throwing I mean.)

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